Developers, Ecosystems, the Universe and Everything, i.e. 42

Someone once said that “at a startup you’re not competing with other startups, you’re competing with apathy”.  I’ve found this to be true over a long stretch in startup-land.  I never got crushed by competition, but against apathy my batting average is sub-Mendoza line.  I think about that a lot.  If you and I both jump in a lake, the fact that I floated longer than you did doesn’t matter much if we both drown.

greenhouseWhat brings this to mind is a discussion I had at a team dinner with the estimable Citizen Sigmund of Scrum Inc.  She mentioned some challenges she was having coaching Scrum with a particular team at a company out in a lightly populated section of the state.  The team-dynamics she described reminded me of a difference I always see between teams in hothouse ecosystems like Boston, New York, Seattle and San Francisco and those outside the hothouses.

In a nutshell,  even among comparable companies, it’s almost always more difficult to get teams to buy into tactical Scrum outside the hothouse.  And this is true even when these teams are failing and desperately unhappy.  They often seem like they’d rather fail in a way that’s familiar to them than succeed doing things differently.

sumoThe third leg of this observation, was a dark data point I gathered a lonnnnngggggg time ago.  Back in the day I figure skated.  Yes, it was often as funny as it sounds.  And having done it for many years, I had a certain impression of how I looked out there, how good I was.  Then I saw myself on video.

Oh, ignorance was certainly bliss.  When I skated, it felt good, so it must look good … it must be good.  It wasn’t.  Same thing happens to dev teams in the wild.  They get into a way of working and the paychecks keep coming so it must be good.  But it often isn’t and they have NO idea because they’re not surrounded by world-class competition.

How does this relate to startups and apathy?  It’s the age-old question of how do you know when you’re succeeding.  Startups often measure themselves against each other – how much money we’ve raised for example – when what they need to measure their success against is their market’s innate inclination to DO NOTHING.

When I skated, I knew what good skating looked like from seeing good skaters in person, and on TV, but I didn’t know what I looked like.  Devs in the wild have the opposite problem.  They know what they look like, but they don’t know what good devs look like.  They only have each other to refer to, not a wider pool of people doing the same thing in different ways.

What does it all mean?  Measure things, don’t assume you’re doing well as I did on the ice before the age of video.  Measure the right things, don’t be That Guy sitting around at Starbucks bragging about how much money your company raised.  And finally, compare your, your team’s, and your company’s metrics to the best in the world, not just to the people and companies in your immediate vicinity.